Showing posts tagged Buddhism
Enlightenment can be measured by how compassionately and wisely you interact with others—with all others, not just those who support you in the way that you want. How you interact with those who do not support you shows how enlightened you really are.

Mudita: appreciative joy, happiness for someone’s happiness

"We need to understand the inadequacy of an educational system so slanted towards material values. The solution is not to give an occasional lecture, but to integrate ethics into the educational curriculum. To do this effectively requires a secular ethics, free of religious influence, based on common sense, a realistic view and scientific findings."
—Dalai Lama

https://www.facebook.com/DalaiLama/posts/10151409127032616

"We need to understand the inadequacy of an educational system so slanted towards material values. The solution is not to give an occasional lecture, but to integrate ethics into the educational curriculum. To do this effectively requires a secular ethics, free of religious influence, based on common sense, a realistic view and scientific findings."
—Dalai Lama

https://www.facebook.com/DalaiLama/posts/10151409127032616

“In Indian mathematics, the zero sign is shunya, but it has quite a different meaning from ‘zero’ in the West. When we think of zero, we think ‘nothing,’ but in India the circle of shunya, or zero, means ‘fullness,’ ‘completeness,’ or ‘wholeness.’ In the same way, ‘emptiness’ does not mean nothingness,’ but rather ‘fullness’ in the sense of full potential—anything can happen in emptiness and because of emptiness.”

—Karl Brunnhölzl

Brunnhölzl, K. (2012). The heart attack sutra: A new commentary on the Heart Sutra. Itaca, NY: Snow Lion Publications.

Yoga Nine Vipassana

The Samurai-Turned-Monk

This samurai went to the Zen temple on the mountain and lived there for many years. He didn’t seem to be getting anything out of the practice. So he said to the Master, “I think I need to leave. Nothing’s happening as a result of this practice.” So the master said, “Okay. Go.”

As he was coming down the hill one of his former comrades, a fellow samurai, saw him in the tattered robes of a Buddhist monk, which is equivalent to a glorified beggar from a samurai’s point of view, and he said, “How could you be so undignified to join the counter-culture of Buddhist beggars?” and he spit on him. Now in the old days the samurais were extremely proud. Any insult to their personal dignity meant a fight to the death. So the monk who had formerly been a samurai just walked on and after he’d walked a certain distance, it occurred to him that not only did he not need to kill this guy, he wasn’t even angry.

As the story goes he turned around and bowed toward the mountain three times where he had practiced. He bowed in his recognition of all that he had worked through. He recognized he no longer needed to kill someone that had offended his dignity. He noticed how fundamentally he had changed as a human being.

Of course, it’s not just samurai in sixteenth century Japan. The same things apply to twenty-first century North Americans. Maybe they’ve been practicing for ten, twenty, or thirty years and it doesn’t seem that much has changed. And then something big happens like a major bereavement, a major illness like cancer, a serious injury, or their life is somehow threatened. Then they notice how everyone around them is freaking out and how much less they’re freaking out.

Shinzen Young


On Enlightenment – An Interview with Shinzen Young. Interview by Har Prakash Khalsa

http://harprakashkhalsa.wordpress.com/on-enlightenment-an-interview-with-shinzen-young/

Yoga Nine Vipassana

Be sure to protect your third eye against harmful UV rays.


Yoga Nine Vipassana

Yoga Nine Vipassana

Yoga Nine Vipassana

“Hatred tends to simplify and to turn its objects into cartoons. Hatred very rarely, if ever, engages with a real person, with all his or her complexities. Hatred is not interested in the many facets of its object, the whole contextualized history within a family and an environment.”

  —Alan Wallace

Yoga Nine Vipassana

Yoga Nine Vipassana

“The sky is not oneness with clouds. Clouds are temporary; they come and go. Depending on causes and conditions, clouds come; depending on other causes and conditions, they go, and the sky becomes clear.”
—Lama Zopa Rinpoche  

Yoga Nine Vipassana